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Online Medical Professionalism: Patient and Public Relationships: Policy Statement From the American College of Physicians and the Federation of State Medical Boards

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Internal Medicine, April 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
413 tweeters
facebook
42 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
7 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
204 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
223 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Online Medical Professionalism: Patient and Public Relationships: Policy Statement From the American College of Physicians and the Federation of State Medical Boards
Published in
Annals of Internal Medicine, April 2013
DOI 10.7326/0003-4819-158-8-201304160-00100
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeanne M. Farnan

Abstract

User-created content and communications on Web-based applications, such as networking sites, media sharing sites, or blog platforms, have dramatically increased in popularity over the past several years, but there has been little policy or guidance on the best practices to inform standards for the professional conduct of physicians in the digital environment. Areas of specific concern include the use of such media for nonclinical purposes, implications for confidentiality, the use of social media in patient education, and how all of this affects the public's trust in physicians as patient-physician interactions extend into the digital environment. Opportunities afforded by online applications represent a new frontier in medicine as physicians and patients become more connected. This position paper from the American College of Physicians and the Federation of State Medical Boards examines and provides recommendations about the influence of social media on the patient-physician relationship, the role of these media in public perception of physician behaviors, and strategies for physician-physician communication that preserve confidentiality while best using these technologies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 413 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 223 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 3%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Malaysia 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Saudi Arabia 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 202 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 21 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 9%
Researcher 21 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 9%
Other 77 35%
Unknown 22 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 115 52%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 10%
Social Sciences 14 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 4%
Computer Science 8 4%
Other 23 10%
Unknown 32 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 413. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2020.
All research outputs
#30,882
of 15,395,085 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Internal Medicine
#204
of 11,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#243
of 154,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Internal Medicine
#1
of 114 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,395,085 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,368 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 154,646 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 114 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.