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Tracing genetic history of modern humans using X-chromosome lineages

Overview of attention for article published in Human Genetics, August 2007
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Tracing genetic history of modern humans using X-chromosome lineages
Published in
Human Genetics, August 2007
DOI 10.1007/s00439-007-0413-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vania Yotova, Jean-François Lefebvre, Oleksiy Kohany, Jerzy Jurka, Roman Michalski, David Modiano, Gerd Utermann, Scott M. Williams, Damian Labuda

Abstract

Genetic variability of the compound interrupted microsatellite DXS1238, in intron 44 of the dystrophin gene, provides evidence for a complex structure of the ancestral population that led to the emergence of modern humans. We sequenced DXS1238 in 600 X-chromosomes from all over the world. Forty four percent of African-specific chromosomes belong to the ancestral lineage that did not participate in the out-of-Africa expansion and subsequent colonization of other continents. Based on the coalescence analysis these lineages separated from those that contributed to the out-of-Africa expansion 366 +/- 136 thousands years ago (Kya). Independently, the analysis of the variance in the repeat length and of the decay of the ancestral alleles of the two DXS1238 repeats, GT and GA, dates this separation at more than 200 Kya. This suggests a complex demographic history and genetic structure of the African melting pot that led to the emergence of modern humans and their out-of-Africa migration. The subsequent subdivisions of human populations among different continents appear to be preceded by even more structured population history within Africa itself, which resulted from a restricted gene flow between lineages allowing for genetic differences to accumulate. If the transition to modern humans occurred during that time, it necessarily follows that genes associated with this transformation spread between subpopulations via gene flow. Otherwise, in spite of subsequent anatomical variation, Homo sapiens as a species could have emerged in Africa already between 300 and 200 Kya, i.e. before the mitochondrial DNA and well before the Y-chromosome most recent common ancestors.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 33 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 29%
Researcher 7 20%
Professor 6 17%
Other 3 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 6%
Other 7 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 43%
Arts and Humanities 5 14%
Social Sciences 5 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2008.
All research outputs
#2,779,916
of 12,215,443 outputs
Outputs from Human Genetics
#460
of 2,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,449
of 138,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Genetics
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,215,443 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,462 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 138,532 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.