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Mercury exposure may influence fluctuating asymmetry in waterbirds

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Mercury exposure may influence fluctuating asymmetry in waterbirds
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, January 2017
DOI 10.1002/etc.3688
Pubmed ID
Authors

Garth Herring, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Joshua T. Ackerman

Abstract

Variation in avian bilateral symmetry can be an indicator of development instability in response to a variety of stressors, including environmental contaminants. We used composite measures of fluctuating asymmetry to examine the influence of mercury concentrations in two tissues on fluctuating asymmetry within four waterbird species. Fluctuating asymmetry increased with mercury concentrations in whole blood and breast feathers of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), a species with elevated mercury concentrations. Specifically, fluctuating asymmetry in rectrix feather number one was the most strongly correlated structural variable of those tested (wing chord, tarsus, primary feather number 10, rectrix feather number 6) with mercury concentrations in Forster's terns. However, for American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia), we found no relationship between fluctuating asymmetry and either whole blood or breast feather mercury concentrations, even though these species had moderate to elevated mercury exposure. Our results indicate that mercury contamination may act as an environmental stressor during development and feather growth, and contribute to fluctuating asymmetry of some species of highly contaminated waterbirds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 29%
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Professor 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 34%
Environmental Science 11 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2018.
All research outputs
#4,166,909
of 17,362,547 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#828
of 4,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,695
of 244,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#10
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,362,547 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,815 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.