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Brain volumes and regional cortical thickness in young females with anorexia nervosa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Brain volumes and regional cortical thickness in young females with anorexia nervosa
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-1126-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tone Seim Fuglset, Tor Endestad, Eva Hilland, Lasse Bang, Christian Krog Tamnes, Nils Inge Landrø, Øyvind Rø

Abstract

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness, with an unknown etiology. Magnetic resonance imaging studies show reduced brain volumes and cortical thickness in patients compared to healthy controls. However, findings are inconsistent, especially concerning the anatomical location and extent of the differences. The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare brain volumes and regional cortical thickness in young females with AN and healthy controls. Magnetic resonance imaging data was acquired from young females with anorexia nervosa (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 28). Two different scanner sites were used. BMI varied from 13.5 to 20.7 within the patient group, and 11 patients had a BMI > 17.5. FreeSurfer was used to estimate brain volumes and regional cortical thickness. There were no differences between groups in total cerebral cortex volume, white matter volume, or lateral ventricle volume. There were also no volume differences in subcortical grey matter structures. However the results showed reduced cortical thickness bilaterally in the superior parietal gyrus, and in the right inferior parietal and superior frontal gyri. The functional significance of the findings is undetermined as the majority of the included patients was already partially weight-restored. We discuss whether these regions could be related to predisposing factors of the illness, or whether they are regions that are more vulnerable to starvation, malnutrition or associated processes in AN.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Student > Master 6 14%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 8 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 10 24%
Psychology 8 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 14%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 13 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2016.
All research outputs
#6,696,568
of 12,440,396 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,658
of 2,904 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,568
of 350,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#212
of 440 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,396 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,904 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,813 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 440 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.