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Anxiety-like behaviour in adult rats perinatally exposed to maternal calorie restriction

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioural Brain Research, August 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Anxiety-like behaviour in adult rats perinatally exposed to maternal calorie restriction
Published in
Behavioural Brain Research, August 2008
DOI 10.1016/j.bbr.2008.03.021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth A. Levay, Antonio G. Paolini, Antonina Govic, Agnes Hazi, Jim Penman, Stephen Kent

Abstract

Environmental stimuli such as caloric availability during the perinatal period exert a profound influence on the development of an organism. Studies in this domain have focused on the effects of under- and malnutrition while the effects of more mild levels of restriction have not been delineated. Rat dams and their offspring were subjected to one of five dietary regimens: control, CR50% for 3 days preconception, CR25% during gestation, CR25% during lactation, and CR25% during gestation, lactation, and post-weaning (lifelong). The pup retrieval test and maternal observations were conducted during lactation to quantify maternal care. In the pup retrieval test, dams that were concurrently experiencing CR (i.e., from the lactation and lifelong groups) displayed shorter latencies to retrieve all pups than the control and preconception groups and the lactation group constructed better nests than all groups. Adult offspring were tested in three tests of anxiety: the elevated plus maze, open field, and emergence test. No differences were observed in the elevated plus maze; however, in the open field preconception animals made fewer entries and spent more time in the central zone than controls. In addition, preconception offspring exhibited longer latencies to full body emergence, spent less time fully emerged, and spent more time engaged in risk assessment behaviours than all other groups. Offspring from the preconception group were also on average 11% heavier than control rats throughout life and displayed 37% higher serum leptin concentrations than controls. A potential role for leptin in the anxiogenic effect of preconception CR is discussed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Mexico 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 39 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Student > Master 9 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 18%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 10 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 34%
Neuroscience 10 23%
Psychology 7 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 14%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2008.
All research outputs
#2,084,395
of 12,271,071 outputs
Outputs from Behavioural Brain Research
#537
of 3,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,221
of 141,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioural Brain Research
#8
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,271,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 141,099 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.