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A Validated Genome Wide Association Study to Breed Cattle Adapted to an Environment Altered by Climate Change

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, August 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
75 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
116 Mendeley
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Title
A Validated Genome Wide Association Study to Breed Cattle Adapted to an Environment Altered by Climate Change
Published in
PLoS ONE, August 2009
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0006676
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ben J. Hayes, Phil J. Bowman, Amanda J. Chamberlain, Keith Savin, Curt P. van Tassell, Tad S. Sonstegard, Mike E. Goddard

Abstract

Continued production of food in areas predicted to be most affected by climate change, such as dairy farming regions of Australia, will be a major challenge in coming decades. Along with rising temperatures and water shortages, scarcity of inputs such as high energy feeds is predicted. With the motivation of selecting cattle adapted to these changing environments, we conducted a genome wide association study to detect DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms) associated with the sensitivity of milk production to environmental conditions. To do this we combined historical milk production and weather records with dense marker genotypes on dairy sires with many daughters milking across a wide range of production environments in Australia. Markers associated with sensitivity of milk production to feeding level and sensitivity of milk production to temperature humidity index on chromosome nine and twenty nine respectively were validated in two independent populations, one a different breed of cattle. As the extent of linkage disequilibrium across cattle breeds is limited, the underlying causative mutations have been mapped to a small genomic interval containing two promising candidate genes. The validated marker panels we have reported here will aid selection for high milk production under anticipated climate change scenarios, for example selection of sires whose daughters will be most productive at low levels of feeding.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Germany 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 103 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 22%
Student > Master 12 10%
Other 7 6%
Unspecified 6 5%
Other 25 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 85 73%
Unspecified 8 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 4%
Environmental Science 4 3%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 11 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2015.
All research outputs
#983,630
of 12,090,963 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#17,438
of 133,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,284
of 131,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#554
of 4,440 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,090,963 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,004 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,733 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,440 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.