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Do UK university football club players suffer neuropsychological impairment as a consequence of their football (soccer) play?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, July 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 221)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Do UK university football club players suffer neuropsychological impairment as a consequence of their football (soccer) play?
Published in
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, July 2009
DOI 10.1080/13803390802484755
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Rutherford, Richard Stephens, Gordon Fernie, Douglas Potter

Abstract

Male players from football and rugby clubs and sportsmen from a variety of noncontact sports clubs at a UK university were compared on biographical and neuropsychological test measures. A data analysis paradigm was developed and employed to control the inflation of Type 1 error rate due to multiple hypotheses testing. Rugby players sustained most head injuries in their chosen sport, but neuropsychological tests of attention, memory, and executive function provided no evidence of performance impairment attributable to the number of head injuries sustained or the football, rugby, or noncontact sport groups. Footballers' heading frequency was related to the number of football head injuries sustained, but no relationship was detected between footballers' heading frequency and their neuropsychological test performance. Following discussion of pertinent methodological limitations it is concluded that there was no evidence in this dataset of neuropsychological impairment consistent with either mild head injury incidence or football heading frequency. However, a need for further research examining the long-term neuropsychological consequences of such head injuries was identified.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 80 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 17%
Student > Bachelor 14 17%
Unspecified 12 14%
Researcher 11 13%
Other 18 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 25%
Unspecified 15 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 17%
Sports and Recreations 12 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Other 15 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2009.
All research outputs
#329,121
of 3,624,910 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
#18
of 221 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,165
of 85,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,624,910 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 221 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,092 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them