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Association of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor polymorphisms with chronic hepatitis C and responses to therapy in Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics and Molecular Biology, January 2013
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Title
Association of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor polymorphisms with chronic hepatitis C and responses to therapy in Brazil
Published in
Genetics and Molecular Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1590/s1415-47572013000100004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota de, Móia, Lizomar de Jesus Maués Pereira, Amaral, Ivanete do Socorro Abraçado, Miranda, Esther Castello Branco Mello, CicaliseTakeshita, Louise Yukari, Oliveira, Layanna Freitas de, Mendes, Lilian de Araújo Melo, Sastre, Danuta, Tamegão-Lopes, Bruna Pedroso, Pedroza, Larysse Santa Rosa de Aquino, Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista dos, Soares, Manoel do Carmo Pereira, Araújo, Marialva Tereza Ferreira de, Bandeira, Camila Lucas, Silva, Adriana Maria Paixão de Sousa da, Medeiros, Zilene Lameira de, Sena, Leonardo, Demachki, Samia, Santos, Eduardo José Melo dos

Abstract

Soroprevalence for Hepatitis C virus is reported as 2.12% in Northern Brazil, with about 50% of the patients exhibiting a sustained virological response (SVR). Aiming to associate polymorphisms in Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) with chronic hepatitis C and therapy responses we investigated 125 chronic patients and 345 controls. Additionally, 48 ancestry markers were genotyped to control for population stratification. The frequency of the KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL2+HLA-C(Asp80) gene and ligand was higher in chronic infected patients than in controls (p < 0.0009, OR = 3.4; p = 0.001, OR = 3.45). In fact, KIR2DL3 is a weaker inhibitor of NK activity than KIR2DL2, which could explain the association of KIR2DL2 with chronic infection. Moreover, KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS2+HLA-C(Asp80) (p < 0.0001, OR = 2.51; p = 0.0084, OR = 2.62) and KIR2DS3 (p < 0.0001; OR = 2.57) were associated with chronic infection, independently from KIR2DL2. No differences in ancestry composition were observed between control and patients, even with respect to therapy response groups. The allelic profile KIR2DL2/KIR2DS2/KIR2DS3 was associated with the chronic hepatitis C (p < 0.0001; OR = 3). Furthermore, the patients also showed a higher mean number of activating genes and a lower frequency of the homozygous AA profile, which is likely secondary to the association with non-AA and/or activating genes. In addition, the KIR2DS5 allele was associated with SVR (p = 0.0261; OR = 0.184).The ancestry analysis of samples ruled out any effects of population substructuring and did not evidence interethnic differences in therapy response, as suggested in previous studies.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 6 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Professor 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2013.
All research outputs
#3,293,370
of 4,655,094 outputs
Outputs from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,474
of 89,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#2
of 3 outputs
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