↓ Skip to main content

Circadian disruption and colorectal cancer incidence in Black women

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, November 2022
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Circadian disruption and colorectal cancer incidence in Black women
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, November 2022
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-22-0808
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lauren E. Barber, Trang VoPham, Laura F. White, Hemant K. Roy, Julie R. Palmer, Kimberly A. Bertrand

Abstract

Animal and experimental studies suggest circadian disruption increases colorectal cancer risk, but evidence in humans is limited. We examined night shift work, chronotype, and residential position within a time zone, proxies for circadian disruption, in relation to colorectal cancer risk. Participants in the Black Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort of 59,000 Black American women established in 1995, reported history of night shift work and chronotype on follow-up questionnaires. Residential position within a time zone was estimated using participant addresses at each questionnaire cycle. Number of colorectal cancer cases and follow-up duration varied by analysis depending on timing of exposure assessment, ranging from 204 over the 2005-2018 night shift work study period to 452 over the 1995-2018 residential position study period. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Compared to never having worked a night shift, working a night shift for ≥10 years was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk (HR=1.64, 95% CI 1.01-2.66). However, shorter duration was not. The HR for evening vs. morning chronotype was 0.96 (95% CI 0.73-1.27). Westward position of residence within a time zone was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR per 5-degree longitude increase: 0.92, 95% CI 0.82-1.03). Our findings suggest a possible increased risk of colorectal cancer associated with long duration night shift work; however, results require confirmation in larger studies. Circadian disruption from long-term night shift work may contribute to colorectal cancer development in Black women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2022.
All research outputs
#14,525,663
of 22,557,763 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#2,942
of 4,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,508
of 231,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#4
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,557,763 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,493 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.