↓ Skip to main content

Geochemical assessments and classification of coal mine spoils for better understanding of potential salinity issues at closure

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, January 2013
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
Geochemical assessments and classification of coal mine spoils for better understanding of potential salinity issues at closure
Published in
Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, January 2013
DOI 10.1039/c3em30672k
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jin Hee Park, Xiofang Li, Mansour Edraki, Thomas Baumgartl, Bernie Kirsch, Xiaofang Li, Park JH, Li X, Edraki M, Baumgartl T, Kirsch B

Abstract

Coal mining wastes in the form of spoils, rejects and tailings deposited on a mine lease can cause various environmental issues including contamination by toxic metals, acid mine drainage and salinity. Dissolution of salt from saline mine spoil, in particular, during rainfall events may result in local or regional dispersion of salts through leaching or in the accumulation of dissolved salts in soil pore water and inhibition of plant growth. The salinity in coal mine environments is from the geogenic salt accumulations and weathering of spoils upon surface exposure. The salts are mainly sulfates and chlorides of calcium, magnesium and sodium. The objective of the research is to investigate and assess the source and mobility of salts and trace elements in various spoil types, thereby predicting the leaching behavior of the salts and trace elements from spoils which have similar geochemical properties. X-ray diffraction analysis, total digestion, sequential extraction and column experiments were conducted to achieve the objectives. Sodium and chloride concentrations best represented salinity of the spoils, which might originate from halite. Electrical conductivity, sodium and chloride concentrations in the leachate decreased sharply with increasing leaching cycles. Leaching of trace elements was not significant in the studied area. Geochemical classification of spoil/waste defined for rehabilitation purposes was useful to predict potential salinity, which corresponded with the classification from cluster analysis based on leaching data of major elements. Certain spoil groups showed high potential salinity by releasing high sodium and chloride concentrations. Therefore, the leaching characteristics of sites having saline susceptible spoils require monitoring, and suitable remediation technologies have to be applied.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 14%
United States 1 14%
Unknown 5 71%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 43%
Other 2 29%
Professor 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 43%
Unspecified 1 14%
Environmental Science 1 14%
Chemical Engineering 1 14%
Chemistry 1 14%
Other 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2013.
All research outputs
#3,061,320
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts
#125
of 214 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,257
of 89,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 214 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,102 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.