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Climate drives shifts in grass reproductive phenology across the western USA

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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39 Dimensions

Readers on

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126 Mendeley
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Title
Climate drives shifts in grass reproductive phenology across the western USA
Published in
New Phytologist, November 2016
DOI 10.1111/nph.14327
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seth M. Munson, A. Lexine Long

Abstract

The capacity of grass species to alter their reproductive timing across space and through time can indicate their ability to cope with environmental variability and help predict their future performance under climate change. We determined the long-term (1895-2013) relationship between flowering times of grass species and climate in space and time using herbarium records across ecoregions of the western USA. There was widespread concordance of C3 grasses accelerating flowering time and general delays for C4 grasses with increasing mean annual temperature, with the largest changes for annuals and individuals occurring in more northerly, wetter ecoregions. Flowering time was delayed for most grass species with increasing mean annual precipitation across space, while phenology-precipitation relationships through time were more mixed. Our results suggest that the phenology of most grass species has the capacity to respond to increases in temperature and altered precipitation expected with climate change, but weak relationships for some species in time suggest that climate tracking via migration or adaptation may be required. Divergence in phenological responses among grass functional types, species, and ecoregions suggests that climate change will have unequal effects across the western USA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
France 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 122 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 21%
Student > Master 15 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Student > Bachelor 8 6%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 19 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 44%
Environmental Science 33 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 <1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 26 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,525,755
of 15,431,972 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#1,544
of 6,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,181
of 387,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#46
of 144 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,431,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,300 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 387,953 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 144 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.