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Nonassociative learning as gated neural integrator and differentiator in stimulus-response pathways.

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioral and Brain Functions, August 2006
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

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Title
Nonassociative learning as gated neural integrator and differentiator in stimulus-response pathways.
Published in
Behavioral and Brain Functions, August 2006
DOI 10.1186/1744-9081-2-29
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chi-Sang Poon, Daniel L Young

Abstract

Nonassociative learning is a basic neuroadaptive behavior exhibited across animal phyla and sensory modalities but its role in brain intelligence is unclear. Current literature on habituation and sensitization, the classic "dual process" of nonassociative learning, gives highly incongruous accounts between varying experimental paradigms. Here we propose a general theory of nonassociative learning featuring four base modes: habituation/primary sensitization in primary stimulus-response pathways, and desensitization/secondary sensitization in secondary stimulus-response pathways. Primary and secondary modes of nonassociative learning are distinguished by corresponding activity-dependent recall, or nonassociative gating, of neurotransmission memory. From the perspective of brain computation, nonassociative learning is a form of integral-differential calculus whereas nonassociative gating is a form of Boolean logic operator--both dynamically transforming the stimulus-response relationship. From the perspective of sensory integration, nonassociative gating provides temporal filtering whereas nonassociative learning affords low-pass, high-pass or band-pass/band-stop frequency filtering--effectively creating an intelligent sensory firewall that screens all stimuli for attention and resultant internal model adaptation and reaction. This unified framework ties together many salient characteristics of nonassociative learning and nonassociative gating and suggests a common kernel that correlates with a wide variety of sensorimotor integration behaviors such as central resetting and self-organization of sensory inputs, fail-safe sensorimotor compensation, integral-differential and gated modulation of sensorimotor feedbacks, alarm reaction, novelty detection and selective attention, as well as a variety of mental and neurological disorders such as sensorimotor instability, attention deficit hyperactivity, sensory defensiveness, autism, nonassociative fear and anxiety, schizophrenia, addiction and craving, pain sensitization and phantom sensations, etc.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 4%
Belgium 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 81 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 25%
Researcher 16 18%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Master 7 8%
Other 5 6%
Other 21 24%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 15%
Neuroscience 9 10%
Computer Science 4 4%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 18 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2013.
All research outputs
#1,810,134
of 3,627,924 outputs
Outputs from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#118
of 253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,328,143
of 2,726,229 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#107
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,627,924 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 253 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 2,726,229 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.