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Cross sectional study of prevalence, genetic diversity and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium parvum cycling in New Zealand dairy farms

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2015
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Title
Cross sectional study of prevalence, genetic diversity and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium parvum cycling in New Zealand dairy farms
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-0855-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julanda Al Mawly, Alex Grinberg, Niluka Velathanthiri, Nigel French

Abstract

The estimation of the prevalence and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium parvum cycling in bovine populations requires the use of genotyping as several morphologically similar non-parvum variants of unproven clinical and public health impact are found in cattle. Robust C. parvum prevalence estimates in cattle are lacking and comparative data of bovine and human parasites collected from the same regions are scarce. Thus, the relative contribution of the oocysts released by farmed animals to human cryptosporidiosis burden is, in general, poorly understood. The New Zealand farm-level C. parvum prevalence was estimated using a cross-sectional sample of 1283 faecal specimens collected from newborn calves on 97 dairy farms. Faeces were analysed by immunofluorescence and the Cryptosporidium parasites were genetically identified. Finally, bovine C. parvum were genetically compared with historical human clinical isolates using a bilocus subtyping scheme. Immunofluoresence-positive faeces were found in 63/97 (65%) farms. C. parvum was identified in 49 (50.5%) farms, C. bovis in 6 (6.1%) farms, and on 8 (8.2%) farms the species could not be identified. The dominant C. parvum genetic variants were geographically widespread and found in both host populations, but several variants were found in humans only. Phenotypic tests offered by New Zealand veterinary diagnostic laboratories for the diagnosis of C. parvum may have moderate to high positive predictive values. The genetic similarities observed between human and bovine C. parvum support a model considering calves as significant amplifiers of zoonotic C. parvum in New Zealand. However, data suggest that transmission routes not associated with dairy cattle should also be taken into account in future source-attribution studies of human cryptosporidiosis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 21%
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 28%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2013.
All research outputs
#14,206,787
of 16,109,038 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#3,735
of 4,311 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#323,831
of 391,910 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#506
of 562 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 4,311 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 562 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.