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Hepatitis C Virus Pathogen Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP) Triggers Production of Lambda-Interferons by Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Pathogens, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

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Title
Hepatitis C Virus Pathogen Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP) Triggers Production of Lambda-Interferons by Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells
Published in
PLoS Pathogens, January 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003316
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy E. L. Stone, Silvia Giugliano, Gretja Schnell, Linling Cheng, Katelyn F. Leahy, Lucy Golden-Mason, Michael Gale Jr, Hugo R. Rosen

Abstract

Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell in the defense against viruses. Through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), these cells detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an Interferon (IFN) response. pDCs produce the antiviral IFNs including the well-studied Type I and the more recently described Type III. Recent genome wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated Type III IFNs in HCV clearance. We examined the IFN response induced in a pDC cell line and ex vivo human pDCs by a region of the HCV genome referred to as the HCV PAMP. This RNA has been shown previously to be immunogenic in hepatocytes, whereas the conserved X-region RNA is not. We show that in response to the HCV PAMP, pDC-GEN2.2 cells upregulate and secrete Type III (in addition to Type I) IFNs and upregulate PRR genes and proteins. We also demonstrate that the recognition of this RNA is dependent on RIG-I-like Receptors (RLRs) and Toll-like Receptors (TLRs), challenging the dogma that RLRs are dispensable in pDCs. The IFNs produced by these cells in response to the HCV PAMP also control HCV replication in vitro. These data are recapitulated in ex vivo pDCs isolated from healthy donors. Together, our data shows that pDCs respond robustly to HCV RNA to make Type III Interferons that control viral replication. This may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HCV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 50 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 30%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 3 6%
Other 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 72%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2017.
All research outputs
#4,235,051
of 8,392,157 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Pathogens
#3,627
of 4,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,763
of 120,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Pathogens
#98
of 148 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,392,157 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,926 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,590 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 148 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.