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Untapped potential of health impact assessment

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
76 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
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Title
Untapped potential of health impact assessment
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, January 2013
DOI 10.2471/blt.12.112318
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mirko S Winkler, Gary R Krieger, Mark J Divall, Guéladio Cissé, Mark Wielga, Burton H Singer, Marcel Tanner, Jürg Utzinger

Abstract

The World Health Organization has promoted health impact assessment (HIA) for over 20 years. At the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), HIA was discussed as a critical method for linking health to "green economy" and "institutional framework" strategies for sustainable development. In countries having a high human development index (HDI), HIA has been added to the overall assessment suite that typically includes potential environmental and social impacts, but it is rarely required as part of the environmental and social impact assessment for large development projects. When they are performed, project-driven HIAs are governed by a combination of project proponent and multilateral lender performance standards rather than host country requirements. Not surprisingly, in low-HDI countries HIA is missing from the programme and policy arena in the absence of an external project driver. Major drivers of global change (e.g. population growth and urbanization, growing pressure on natural resources and climate change) inordinately affect low- and medium-HDI countries; however, in such countries HIA is conspicuously absent. If the cloak of HIA invisibility is to be removed, it must be shown that HIA is useful and beneficial and, hence, an essential component of the 21st century's sustainable development agenda. We analyse where and how HIA can become fully integrated into the impact assessment suite and argue that the impact of HIA must not remain obscure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 99 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 2%
Student > Bachelor 1 1%
Researcher 1 1%
Student > Master 1 1%
Unknown 94 95%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Linguistics 1 1%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 1%
Unknown 94 95%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2019.
All research outputs
#3,142,564
of 20,029,941 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,034
of 4,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,732
of 172,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#10
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,029,941 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.