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Natural variation in CBF gene sequence, gene expression and freezing tolerance in the Versailles core collection of Arabidopsis thaliana

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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67 Dimensions

Readers on

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110 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Natural variation in CBF gene sequence, gene expression and freezing tolerance in the Versailles core collection of Arabidopsis thaliana
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, January 2008
DOI 10.1186/1471-2229-8-105
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heather I Mckhann, Carine Gery, Aurelie Berard, Sylvie Leveque, Ellen Zuther, Dirk K Hincha, S De Mita, Dominique Brunel, Evelyne Teoule

Abstract

Plants from temperate regions are able to withstand freezing temperatures due to a process known as cold acclimation, which is a prior exposure to low, but non-freezing temperatures. During acclimation, a large number of genes are induced, bringing about biochemical changes in the plant, thought to be responsible for the subsequent increase in freezing tolerance. Key regulatory proteins in this process are the CBF1, 2 and 3 transcription factors which control the expression of a set of target genes referred to as the "CBF regulon". To assess the role of the CBF genes in cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana, the CBF genes and their promoters were sequenced in the Versailles core collection, a set of 48 accessions that maximizes the naturally-occurring genetic diversity, as well as in the commonly used accessions Col-0 and WS. Extensive polymorphism was found in all three genes. Freezing tolerance was measured in all accessions to assess the variability in acclimated freezing tolerance. The effect of sequence polymorphism was investigated by evaluating the kinetics of CBF gene expression, as well as that of a subset of the target COR genes, in a set of eight accessions with contrasting freezing tolerance. Our data indicate that CBF genes as well as the selected COR genes are cold induced in all accessions, irrespective of their freezing tolerance. Although we observed different levels of expression in different accessions, CBF or COR gene expression was not closely correlated with freezing tolerance. Our results indicate that the Versailles core collection contains significant natural variation with respect to freezing tolerance, polymorphism in the CBF genes and CBF and COR gene expression. Although there tends to be more CBF and COR gene expression in tolerant accessions, there are exceptions, reinforcing the idea that a complex network of genes is involved in freezing tolerance and that the CBF genes alone cannot explain all differences in phenotype. Our study also highlights the difficulty in assessing the function of single transcription factors that are members of closely related gene families.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Germany 2 2%
Canada 2 2%
France 2 2%
Italy 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 97 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 25%
Professor > Associate Professor 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Student > Master 5 5%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 3 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 87 79%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 12%
Unspecified 1 <1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 6 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2016.
All research outputs
#2,269,244
of 8,683,790 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#243
of 1,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,264
of 298,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#6
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,683,790 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 60th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,194 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,111 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.