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Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Controls the Changes in Yeast Ribosomal Protein Pre-mRNAs Levels upon Osmotic Stress

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, April 2013
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Title
Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Controls the Changes in Yeast Ribosomal Protein Pre-mRNAs Levels upon Osmotic Stress
Published in
PLoS ONE, April 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0061240
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elena Garre, Lorena Romero-Santacreu, Manuela Barneo-Muñoz, Ana Miguel, José E. Pérez-Ortín, Paula Alepuz

Abstract

The expression of ribosomal protein (RP) genes requires a substantial part of cellular transcription, processing and translation resources. Thus, the RP expression must be tightly regulated in response to conditions that compromise cell survival. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, regulation of the RP gene expression at the transcriptional, mature mRNA stability and translational levels during the response to osmotic stress has been reported. Reprogramming global protein synthesis upon osmotic shock includes the movement of ribosomes from RP transcripts to stress-induced mRNAs. Using tiling arrays, we show that osmotic stress yields a drop in the levels of RP pre-mRNAs in S. cerevisiae cells. An analysis of the tiling array data, together with transcription rates data, shows a poor correlation, indicating that the drop in the RP pre-mRNA levels is not merely a result of the lowered RP transcription rates. A kinetic study using quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the decrease in the levels of several RP-unspliced transcripts during the first 15 minutes of osmotic stress, which seems independent of MAP kinase Hog1. Moreover, we found that the mutations in the components of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), Upf1, Upf2, Upf3 or in exonuclease Xrn1, eliminate the osmotic stress-induced drop in RP pre-mRNAs. Altogether, our results indicate that the degradation of yeast RP unspliced transcripts by NMD increases during osmotic stress, and suggest that this might be another mechanism to control RP synthesis during the stress response.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 49 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 31%
Researcher 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Professor 5 10%
Unspecified 5 10%
Other 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 31%
Unspecified 4 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2013.
All research outputs
#3,129,384
of 3,913,240 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#54,622
of 68,939 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,728
of 85,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#3,107
of 4,162 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,913,240 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68,939 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,874 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,162 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.