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Early Biomarkers from Conventional and Delayed-Contrast MRI to Predict the Response to Bevacizumab in Recurrent High-Grade Gliomas

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, July 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
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Title
Early Biomarkers from Conventional and Delayed-Contrast MRI to Predict the Response to Bevacizumab in Recurrent High-Grade Gliomas
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, July 2016
DOI 10.3174/ajnr.a4866
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Daniels, D. Guez, D. Last, C. Hoffmann, D. Nass, A. Talianski, G. Tsarfaty, S. Salomon, A.A. Kanner, D.T. Blumenthal, F. Bokstein, S. Harnof, D. Yekutieli, S. Zamir, Z.R. Cohen, L. Zach, Y. Mardor

Abstract

The interpretation of the radiologic response of bevacizumab-treated patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas represents a unique challenge. Delayed-contrast MR imaging was recently introduced for calculating treatment-response-assessment maps in patients with brain tumors, providing clear separation between active tumor and treatment effects. We studied the application of standard and delayed-contrast MR imaging for assessing and predicting the response to bevacizumab. Twenty-four patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas were scanned before and during bevacizumab treatment by standard and delayed-contrast MR imaging. The mean change in lesion volumes of responders (overall survival, ≥1 year) and nonresponders (overall survival, <1 year) was studied. The lesion volumes at baseline and the changes in lesion volumes 1 month after treatment initiation, calculated from standard and delayed-contrast MRIs, were studied as possible predictors of outcome. In scans acquired at progression, the average change in lesion volume from previous follow-up in standard and delayed-contrast MRIs was compared. Response and progression patterns were identified from the mean change in lesion volumes, depicted from conventional T1WI, delayed contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and DSC MR imaging. Thresholds for early prediction of response were calculated by using these sequences. For each predictor, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values were calculated, reaching 85.7%, 87.5%, 75%, and 93.3% for conventional T1WI; 100%, 87.5%, 77.8%, and 100% for delayed-contrast MR imaging; and 75%, 78.6%, 50%, and 91.7% for DSC MR imaging. The benefit of delayed-contrast MR imaging in separating responders and nonresponders was further confirmed by using log-rank tests (conventional T1WI, P = .0022; delayed-contrast MR imaging, P < .0001; DSC MR imaging, P = .0232) and receiver operating characteristic analyses. At progression, the increase in lesion volumes in delayed-contrast MR imaging was 37.5% higher than the increase in conventional T1WI (P < .01); these findings suggest that progression may be depicted more effectively in treatment-response-assessment maps. The benefit of contrast-enhanced MR imaging for assessing and predicting the response to bevacizumab was demonstrated. The increased sensitivity of the treatment-response-assessment maps reflects their potential contribution to the management of bevacizumab-treated patients with recurrent high-grade glioma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 5%
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 19 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 48%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 67%
Unspecified 3 14%
Neuroscience 3 14%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2019.
All research outputs
#2,451,878
of 13,459,972 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#593
of 3,386 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,522
of 375,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#24
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,459,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,386 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,858 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.