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Mitigating pharmaceutical waste exposures: policy and program considerations

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, November 2016
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1 Google+ user

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Mitigating pharmaceutical waste exposures: policy and program considerations
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13584-016-0118-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric D. Amster

Abstract

Pharmaceutical disposal and the environmental fate of medication metabolites directly impacts the public's health in two significant ways: accidental medication ingestion of pharmaceuticals that were not disposed of properly results in inadvertent toxicity; and environmental health consequences of pharmaceuticals that were inappropriately disposed and which contaminate municipal water supply. In reviewing the effectiveness of medication disposal policy globally, it is crucial to not only determine which policies are effective but also to assess why they are effective. By assessing the root causes for a specific policy's effectiveness it can be determined if those successes could be translated to another country with a different health care system, unique culture and divergent policy ecosystem. Any intervention regarding pharmaceutical disposal would require a multifaceted approach beyond raising awareness and coordinating pharmaceutical disposal on a national level. While consumer participation is important, effective primary prevention would also include research on drug development that is designed to biodegrade in the environment as opposed to medications that persist and accumulate in the natural environment even when properly disposed. Countries that lack a nationalized disposal policy should leverage the resources and infrastructure already in place in the national health care system to implement a unified policy to address medication disposal in the short-term. In tandem, efforts should be made to recruit the biotechnology sector in high-tech and academia to develop new technologies in medication design and water filtration to decrease exposures in the long-term.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 33%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 33%
Environmental Science 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Engineering 2 7%
Chemistry 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,686,029
of 8,686,406 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#120
of 234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,569
of 298,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#8
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,686,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 234 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,395 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.