↓ Skip to main content

Climate-driven increase of natural wetland methane emissions offset by human-induced wetland reduction in China over the past three decades

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Climate-driven increase of natural wetland methane emissions offset by human-induced wetland reduction in China over the past three decades
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep38020
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiuan Zhu, Changhui Peng, Jinxun Liu, Hong Jiang, Xiuqin Fang, Huai Chen, Zhenguo Niu, Peng Gong, Guanghui Lin, Meng Wang, Han Wang, Yanzheng Yang, Jie Chang, Ying Ge, Wenhua Xiang, Xiangwen Deng, Jin-Sheng He

Abstract

Both anthropogenic activities and climate change can affect the biogeochemical processes of natural wetland methanogenesis. Quantifying possible impacts of changing climate and wetland area on wetland methane (CH4) emissions in China is important for improving our knowledge on CH4 budgets locally and globally. However, their respective and combined effects are uncertain. We incorporated changes in wetland area derived from remote sensing into a dynamic CH4 model to quantify the human and climate change induced contributions to natural wetland CH4 emissions in China over the past three decades. Here we found that human-induced wetland loss contributed 34.3% to the CH4 emissions reduction (0.92 TgCH4), and climate change contributed 20.4% to the CH4 emissions increase (0.31 TgCH4), suggesting that decreasing CH4 emissions due to human-induced wetland reductions has offset the increasing climate-driven CH4 emissions. With climate change only, temperature was a dominant controlling factor for wetland CH4 emissions in the northeast (high latitude) and Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (high altitude) regions, whereas precipitation had a considerable influence in relative arid north China. The inevitable uncertainties caused by the asynchronous for different regions or periods due to inter-annual or seasonal variations among remote sensing images should be considered in the wetland CH4 emissions estimation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 9 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 22%
Environmental Science 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 14 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2016.
All research outputs
#1,163,162
of 11,340,149 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#9,283
of 48,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,868
of 320,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#642
of 2,991 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,340,149 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 48,207 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,991 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.