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“I just think that we should be informed” a qualitative study of family involvement in advance care planning in nursing homes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Ethics, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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71 Mendeley
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Title
“I just think that we should be informed” a qualitative study of family involvement in advance care planning in nursing homes
Published in
BMC Medical Ethics, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12910-016-0156-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisbeth Thoresen, Lillian Lillemoen

Abstract

As part of the research project "End-of-life Communication in Nursing Homes. Patient Preferences and Participation", we have studied how Advance Care Planning (ACP) is carried out in eight Norwegian nursing homes. The concept of ACP is a process for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of progressive illness, anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. While an individualistic autonomy based attitude is at the fore in most studies on ACP, there is a lack of empirical studies on how family members' participation and involvement in ACP- conversations may promote nursing home patients' participation in decisions on future treatment and end-of-life care. Based on empirical data and family ethics perspectives, the purpose of this study is to add insights to the complexity of ACP-conversations and illuminate how a family ethics perspective may improve the quality of the ACP and promote nursing home patients' participation in advance care planning. Participant observations of ACP-conversations in eight nursing homes. The observations were followed by interviews with patients and relatives together on how they experienced being part of the conversation, and expressing their views on future medical treatment, hospitalization and end-of-life issues. We found that the way nursing home patients and relatives are connected and related to each other, constitutes an intertwined unit. Further, we found that relatives' involvement and participation in ACP- conversations is significant to uncover, and give the nursing home staff insight into, what is important in the nursing home patient's life at the time. The third analytical theme is patients' and relatives' shared experiences of the dying and death of others. Drawing on past experiences can be a way of introducing or talking about death. An individual autonomy approach in advance care planning should be complemented with a family ethics approach. To be open to family ethics when planning for the patient's future in the nursing home is to be open to diversity and nuances and to the significance of the patient's former life and experiences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 23%
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Other 5 7%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 25 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 15%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2016.
All research outputs
#4,176,723
of 9,790,586 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Ethics
#272
of 459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,193
of 317,954 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Ethics
#10
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,790,586 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 459 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,954 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.