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How to tell a happy from an unhappy schizotype: personality factors and mental health outcomes in individuals with psychotic experiences

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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71 Mendeley
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Title
How to tell a happy from an unhappy schizotype: personality factors and mental health outcomes in individuals with psychotic experiences
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, November 2016
DOI 10.1590/1516-4446-2016-1944
Pubmed ID
Authors

Letícia O. Alminhana, Miguel Farias, Gordon Claridge, Claude R. Cloninger, Alexander Moreira-Almeida

Abstract

It is unclear why some individuals reporting psychotic experiences have balanced lives while others go on to develop mental health problems. The objective of this study was to test if the personality traits of harm avoidance, self-directedness, and self-transcendence can be used as criteria to differentiate healthy from unhealthy schizotypal individuals. We interviewed 115 participants who reported a high frequency of psychotic experiences. The instruments used were the Temperament and Character Inventory (140), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, and the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences. Harm avoidance predicted cognitive disorganization (β = 0.319; t = 2.94), while novelty seeking predicted bipolar disorder (β = 0.136, Exp [β] = 1.146) and impulsive non-conformity (β = 0.322; t = 3.55). Self-directedness predicted an overall decrease in schizotypy, most of all in cognitive disorganization (β = -0.356; t = -2.95) and in impulsive non-conformity (β = -0.313; t = -2.83). Finally, self-transcendence predicted unusual experiences (β = 0.256; t = 2.32). Personality features are important criteria to distinguish between pathology and mental health in individuals presenting high levels of anomalous experiences (AEs). While self-directedness is a protective factor, both harm avoidance and novelty seeking were predictors of negative mental health outcomes. We suggest that the impact of AEs on mental health is moderated by personality factors.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 4 6%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 30 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 7%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 21 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2019.
All research outputs
#5,664,819
of 21,562,248 outputs
Outputs from Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria
#178
of 437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,453
of 424,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria
#5
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,562,248 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 437 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 424,504 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.