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Boceprevir for previously untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C Genotype 1 infection: a US-based cost-effectiveness modeling study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Boceprevir for previously untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C Genotype 1 infection: a US-based cost-effectiveness modeling study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-13-190
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shannon Allen Ferrante, Jagpreet Chhatwal, Clifford A Brass, Antoine C El Khoury, Fred Poordad, Jean-Pierre Bronowicki, Elamin H Elbasha

Abstract

BACKGROUND: SPRINT-2 demonstrated that boceprevir (BOC), an oral hepatitis C virus (HCV)- nonstructural 3 (NS3) protease inhibitor, added to peginterferon alfa-2b (P) and ribavirin (R) significantly increased sustained virologic response rates over PR alone in previously untreated adult patients with chronic HCV genotype 1. We estimated the long-term impact of triple therapy vs. dual therapy on the clinical burden of HCV and performed a cost-effectiveness evaluation. METHODS: A Markov model was used to estimate the incidence of liver complications, discounted costs (2010 US$), quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of three treatment strategies for treatment-naive patients with chronic HCV genotype 1. The model simulates the treatment regimens studied in SPRINT-2 in which PR was administered for 4 weeks followed by: 1) placebo plus PR for 44 weeks (PR48); 2) BOC plus PR using response guided therapy (BOC/RGT); and 3) BOC plus PR for 44 weeks (BOC/PR48) and makes projections within and beyond the trial. HCV-related state-transition probabilities, costs, and utilities were obtained from previously published studies. All costs and QALYs were discounted at 3%. RESULTS: The model projected approximately 38% and 43% relative reductions in the lifetime incidence of liver complications in the BOC/RGT and BOC/PR48 regimens compared with PR48; respectively. Treatment with BOC/RGT is associated with an incremental cost of $10,348 and an increase of 0.62 QALYs compared to treatment with PR48. Treatment with BOC/PR48 is associated with an incremental cost of $35,727 and an increase of 0.65 QALYs compared to treatment with PR48. The ICERs were $16,792/QALY and $55,162/QALY for the boceprevir-based treatment groups compared with PR48, respectively. The ICER for BOC/PR48 compared with BOC/RGT was $807,804. CONCLUSION: The boceprevir-based regimens used in the SPRINT-2 trial were projected to substantially reduce the lifetime incidence of liver complications and increase the QALYs in treatment-naive patients with hepatitis C genotype 1. It was also demonstrated that boceprevir-based regimens offer patients the possibility of experiencing great clinical benefit with a shorter duration of therapy. Both boceprevir-based treatment strategies were projected to be cost-effective at a reasonable threshold in the US when compared to treatment with PR48.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 43 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 43%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Mathematics 2 4%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 13 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2013.
All research outputs
#1,928,734
of 5,036,908 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#791
of 2,669 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,723
of 92,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#47
of 140 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,908 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 60th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,669 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 92,452 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 140 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.