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The relationship between intelligence and creativity: New support for the threshold hypothesis by means of empirical breakpoint detection.

Overview of attention for article published in intelligence, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#39 of 763)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
45 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Readers on

mendeley
176 Mendeley
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Title
The relationship between intelligence and creativity: New support for the threshold hypothesis by means of empirical breakpoint detection.
Published in
intelligence, July 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.intell.2013.03.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emanuel Jauk, Mathias Benedek, Beate Dunst, Aljoscha C. Neubauer, Jauk E, Benedek M, Dunst B, Neubauer AC

Abstract

The relationship between intelligence and creativity has been subject to empirical research for decades. Nevertheless, there is yet no consensus on how these constructs are related. One of the most prominent notions concerning the interplay between intelligence and creativity is the threshold hypothesis, which assumes that above-average intelligence represents a necessary condition for high-level creativity. While earlier research mostly supported the threshold hypothesis, it has come under fire in recent investigations. The threshold hypothesis is commonly investigated by splitting a sample at a given threshold (e.g., at 120 IQ points) and estimating separate correlations for lower and upper IQ ranges. However, there is no compelling reason why the threshold should be fixed at an IQ of 120, and to date, no attempts have been made to detect the threshold empirically. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between intelligence and different indicators of creative potential and of creative achievement by means of segmented regression analysis in a sample of 297 participants. Segmented regression allows for the detection of a threshold in continuous data by means of iterative computational algorithms. We found thresholds only for measures of creative potential but not for creative achievement. For the former the thresholds varied as a function of criteria: When investigating a liberal criterion of ideational originality (i.e., two original ideas), a threshold was detected at around 100 IQ points. In contrast, a threshold of 120 IQ points emerged when the criterion was more demanding (i.e., many original ideas). Moreover, an IQ of around 85 IQ points was found to form the threshold for a purely quantitative measure of creative potential (i.e., ideational fluency). These results confirm the threshold hypothesis for qualitative indicators of creative potential and may explain some of the observed discrepancies in previous research. In addition, we obtained evidence that once the intelligence threshold is met, personality factors become more predictive for creativity. On the contrary, no threshold was found for creative achievement, i.e. creative achievement benefits from higher intelligence even at fairly high levels of intellectual ability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 176 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 2%
United States 3 2%
France 2 1%
Netherlands 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Lebanon 1 <1%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 156 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 20%
Student > Bachelor 30 17%
Researcher 24 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 11%
Other 31 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 86 49%
Social Sciences 30 17%
Arts and Humanities 10 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 4%
Engineering 7 4%
Other 36 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 97. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2017.
All research outputs
#92,364
of 8,467,419 outputs
Outputs from intelligence
#39
of 763 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,309
of 120,081 outputs
Outputs of similar age from intelligence
#3
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,467,419 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 763 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,081 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.