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Power of Plankton: Effects of Algal Biodiversity on Biocrude Production and Stability

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
Power of Plankton: Effects of Algal Biodiversity on Biocrude Production and Stability
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, November 2016
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b03256
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anita Narwani, Aubrey R. Lashaway, David C. Hietala, Phillip E. Savage, Bradley J. Cardinale

Abstract

Algae-derived biocrude oil is a possible renewable energy alternative to fossil fuel based crude oil. Outdoor cultivation in raceway ponds is estimated to provide a better return on energy invested than closed photobioreactor systems. However, in these open systems, algal crops are subjected to environmental variation in temperature and irradiance, as well as biotic invasions which can cause costly crop instabilities. In this paper, we used an experimental approach to investigate the ability of species richness to maximize and stabilize biocrude production in the face of weekly temperature fluctuations between 17 and 27 °C, relative to a constant-temperature control. We hypothesized that species richness would lead to higher mean biocrude production and greater stability of biocrude production over time in the variable temperature environment. Counter to our hypothesis, species richness tended to cause a decline in mean biocrude production, regardless of environmental temperature variation. However, biodiversity did have stabilizing effects on biocrude production over time in the variable temperature environment and not in the constant temperature environment. Altogether, our results suggest that when the most productive and stable monoculture is unknown, inoculating raceway ponds with a diverse mixture of algae will tend to ensure stable harvests over time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 35%
Environmental Science 6 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Chemistry 3 8%
Engineering 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 10 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2017.
All research outputs
#162,717
of 11,342,318 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#273
of 11,621 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,114
of 320,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#14
of 214 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,342,318 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,621 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,614 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 214 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.