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Learning to care: medical students’ reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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84 Mendeley
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Title
Learning to care: medical students’ reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing
Published in
BMC Medical Education, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0827-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erica Borgstrom, Rachel Morris, Diana Wood, Simon Cohn, Stephen Barclay

Abstract

Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Two studies have explored students' perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1) dedicated time with patients, (2) learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3) practicing communication skills, and (4) learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these encounters valuable and many wrote about the benefit of formally writing about these experiences. Students reported finding this model useful in widening their skill-set and understanding of palliative care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 84 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 19%
Researcher 15 18%
Student > Bachelor 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 24 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 51%
Unspecified 13 15%
Social Sciences 9 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 9 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2017.
All research outputs
#4,832,205
of 10,393,133 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#661
of 1,477 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,569
of 318,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#20
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,393,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,477 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,683 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.