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The Legal Implications of Detecting Alzheimer's Disease Earlier

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, December 2016
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30 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
The Legal Implications of Detecting Alzheimer's Disease Earlier
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, December 2016
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2016.18.12.hlaw1-1612
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) raises a number of challenging legal questions. In this essay, we explore some of those questions, such as: Is a neurological indicator of increased risk for AD a legally relevant brain state before there are any outward behavioral manifestations? How should courts address evidentiary challenges to the admissibility of AD-related neuroimaging? How should the government regulate the marketing of neuroimaging diagnostic tools? How should insurance coverage for the use of these new tools be optimized? We suggest that many voices and multidisciplinary perspectives are needed to answer these questions and ensure that legal responses are swift, efficient, and equitable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 35%
Student > Master 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Other 2 12%
Professor 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 24%
Neuroscience 2 12%
Psychology 2 12%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 6 35%