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AIDS-related knowledge, stigma and customary beliefs of South African construction workers

Overview of attention for article published in AIDS Care, September 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
Title
AIDS-related knowledge, stigma and customary beliefs of South African construction workers
Published in
AIDS Care, September 2016
DOI 10.1080/09540121.2016.1227764
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajen Govender, Paul Bowen, Peter Edwards, Keith Cattell

Abstract

Customary beliefs about the cause/s of AIDS are significantly related to whether or not individuals will undergo HIV testing. This study examined the cultural beliefs of construction workers in terms of their demographic and lifestyle behavioural characteristics, and their AIDS-related knowledge and stigma attitudes, to help inform improved work-based AIDS-education interventions by construction firms. A total of 512 workers drawn from 6 firms operating on 18 construction sites in the Western Cape province participated in the study. Thirty-seven per cent of participants either endorsed customary beliefs/explanations about the cause of AIDS, or were unsure. AIDS-related knowledge proved a significant differentiator of participants endorsing customary beliefs (aOR = 0.8, 95% CI, 0.6-1.0), or being unsure (aOR = 0.5, 95% CI, 0.4-0.6), compared to participants not endorsing such beliefs. Stigma (aOR = 1.3, 95% CI, 1.1-1.7) proved a significant differentiator of participants with more polarized beliefs, namely, those endorsing customary beliefs compared to those not endorsing such beliefs, but was not significant in differentiating these categories from that of being unsure. The challenges to testing behaviour from incorrect AIDS knowledge may be amplified by adherence to customary beliefs that discount scientific explanations about the cause of AIDS. Interventions are required to specifically address misinformation or incorrect knowledge about AIDS derived from traditional beliefs, and should explicitly target persons who either endorse such beliefs or are somewhat equivocal about them. The role of peer educators is highlighted. Traditional healers, given their credibility and status within many traditional cultures, may also have an important role to play in this regard.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 24%
Unspecified 3 18%
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Master 2 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 5 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 24%
Unspecified 3 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Other 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,108,632
of 12,366,641 outputs
Outputs from AIDS Care
#1,320
of 2,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,200
of 343,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AIDS Care
#62
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,366,641 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,004 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,253 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.