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At the nexus of fire, water and society

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
At the nexus of fire, water and society
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, June 2016
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2015.0172
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deborah A. Martin

Abstract

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the effects of fire on the predicted water scarcity and declines in water quality? Drinking water supplies for humans, the emphasis of this exploration, are derived from several land cover types, including forests, grasslands and peatlands, which are vulnerable to fire. In the last two decades, fires have affected the water supply catchments of Denver (CO) and other southwestern US cities, and four major Australian cities including Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide and Melbourne. In the same time period, several, though not all, national, regional and global water assessments have included fire in evaluations of the risks that affect water supplies. The objective of this discussion is to explore the nexus of fire, water and society with the hope that a more explicit understanding of fire effects on water supplies will encourage the incorporation of fire into future assessments of water supplies, into the pyrogeography conceptual framework and into planning efforts directed at water resiliency.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 22%
Researcher 18 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Other 9 8%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 25 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 38 32%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 19 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 11%
Engineering 6 5%
Arts and Humanities 3 3%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 29 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2020.
All research outputs
#680,709
of 17,362,547 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#615
of 5,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,857
of 397,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#14
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,362,547 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,501 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.