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Global phosphorus scarcity: identifying synergies for a sustainable future

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
106 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
248 Mendeley
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Title
Global phosphorus scarcity: identifying synergies for a sustainable future
Published in
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, October 2011
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.4650
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tina-Simone S Neset, Dana Cordell

Abstract

Global food production is dependent on constant inputs of phosphorus. In the current system this phosphorus is not predominantly derived from organic recycled waste, but to a large degree from phosphate-rock based mineral fertilisers. However, phosphate rock is a finite resource that cannot be manufactured. Our dependency therefore needs to be addressed from a sustainability perspective in order to ensure global food supplies for a growing global population. The situation is made more urgent by predictions that, for example, the consumption of resource intensive foods and the demand for biomass energy will increase. The scientific and societal debate has so far been focussed on the exact timing of peak phosphorus and on when the total depletion of the global reserves will occur. Even though the timing of these events is important, all dimensions of phosphorus scarcity need to be addressed in a manner which acknowledges linkages to other sustainable development challenges and which takes into consideration the synergies between different sustainability measures. Many sustainable phosphorus measures have positive impacts on other challenges; for example, shifting global diets to more plant-based foods would not only reduce global phosphorus consumption, but also reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce nitrogen fertiliser demand and reduce water consumption.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 248 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 234 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 66 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 20%
Student > Bachelor 36 15%
Researcher 30 12%
Unspecified 18 7%
Other 48 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 78 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 25%
Engineering 28 11%
Unspecified 26 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 6%
Other 39 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2013.
All research outputs
#3,258,611
of 12,182,743 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
#528
of 2,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,083
of 136,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
#10
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,182,743 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,676 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 136,456 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.