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Navigating the journey of Aboriginal childhood disability: a qualitative study of carers’ interface with services

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Navigating the journey of Aboriginal childhood disability: a qualitative study of carers’ interface with services
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1926-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Green, Penelope Abbott, Patricia Delaney, Patrick Patradoon-Ho, John Delaney, Patricia Mary Davidson, Michelle DiGiacomo

Abstract

The disadvantage experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with a disability is well recognized. The long term consequences of failing to address disability on health, education and employment underlies the importance of early intervention. Caregivers experience a disproportionate burden and have challenges accessing services. The aim of this study was to describe the carer journey of accessing support and services. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews with nineteen parents and carers of Aboriginal children aged 0-8 years. The children were patients at a child developmental clinic at a metropolitan area Aboriginal health service in Eastern Australia. Interpretive phenomenological analysis was applied to transcribed verbatim accounts. Four themes were developed using the 'journey' metaphor to describe the carer pathway of accessing support and services at the community, service and policy levels. Themes included 1) the need for increased signage within communities via community education, information and awareness, 2) wrong way signs, roundabouts and roadblocks encountered when accessing services, 3) alternate routes can facilitate the journey, and 4) incompatibility of inflexible bureaucratic road rules and lived realities. The challenges of caring for a child with a disability are indisputable and these can be compounded for people experiencing socio-economic disadvantage and marginalisation. Overcoming challenges to service access faced by carers of Aboriginal children with a disability will require investment in community, services and policy to tailor culturally appropriate models of care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 26%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 26%
Social Sciences 6 19%
Psychology 3 10%
Arts and Humanities 2 6%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2016.
All research outputs
#4,090,154
of 8,769,477 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,838
of 3,235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,730
of 301,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#53
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,769,477 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,235 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.