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Association between Taenia solium infection and HIV/AIDS in northern Tanzania: a matched cross sectional-study

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 427)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
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Title
Association between Taenia solium infection and HIV/AIDS in northern Tanzania: a matched cross sectional-study
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40249-016-0209-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Veronika Schmidt, Christian Kositz, Karl-Heinz Herbinger, Hélène Carabin, Bernard Ngowi, Ezra Naman, Patricia P. Wilkins, John Noh, William Matuja, Andrea Sylvia Winkler

Abstract

The frequency of Taenia solium, a zoonotic helminth, is increasing in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa, where the prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is also high. However, little is known about how these two infections interact. The aim of this study was to compare the proportion of HIV positive (+) and negative (-) individuals who are infected with Taenia solium (TSOL) and who present with clinical and neurological manifestations of cysticercosis (CC). In northern Tanzania, 170 HIV+ individuals and 170 HIV- controls matched for gender, age and village of origin were recruited. HIV staging and serological tests for TSOL antibodies (Ab) and antigen (Ag) were performed. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) was determined by computed tomography (CT) using standard diagnostic criteria. Neurological manifestations were confirmed by a standard neurological examination. In addition, demographic, clinical and neuroimaging data were collected. Further, CD4(+) cell counts as well as information on highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) were noted. No significant differences between HIV+ and HIV- individuals regarding the sero-prevalence of taeniosis-Ab (0.6% vs 1.2%), CC-Ab (2.4% vs 2.4%) and CC-Ag (0.6% vs 0.0%) were detected. A total of six NCC cases (3 HIV+ and 3 HIV-) were detected in the group of matched participants. Two individuals (1 HIV+ and 1 HIV-) presented with headaches as the main symptom for NCC, and four with asymptomatic NCC. Among the HIV+ group, TSOL was not associated with CD4(+) cell counts, HAART duration or HIV stage. This study found lower prevalence of taeniosis, CC and NCC than had been reported in the region to date. This low level of infection may have resulted in an inability to find cross-sectional associations between HIV status and TSOL infection or NCC. Larger sample sizes will be required in future studies conducted in that area to conclude if HIV influences the way NCC manifests itself.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 24%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2017.
All research outputs
#364,903
of 12,347,662 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#3
of 427 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,850
of 340,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#1
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,347,662 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 427 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.