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Hypoparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism: etiology, laboratory features and complications

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 179)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Hypoparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism: etiology, laboratory features and complications
Published in
Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, November 2016
DOI 10.1590/2359-3997000000221
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lopes, Maicon Piana, Kliemann, Breno S., Bini, Ileana Borsato, Kulchetscki, Rodrigo, Borsani, Victor, Savi, Larissa, Borba, Victoria Z. C., Moreira, Carolina A., Lopes, Maicon Piana, Kliemann, Breno S., Bini, Ileana Borsato, Kulchetscki, Rodrigo, Borsani, Victor, Savi, Larissa, Borba, Victoria Z. C., Moreira, Carolina A.

Abstract

To identify a clinical profile and laboratory findings of a cohort of hypoparathyroidism patients and determine the prevalence and predictors for renal abnormalities. Data from medical records of five different visits were obtained, focusing on therapeutic doses of calcium and vitamin D, on laboratory tests and renal ultrasonography (USG). Fifty-five patients were identified, 42 females and 13 males; mean age of 44.5 and average time of the disease of 11.2 years. The most frequent etiology was post-surgical. Levels of serum calcium and creatinine increased between the first and last visits (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively); and serum levels of phosphate decreased during the same period (p < 0.001). Out of the 55 patients, 40 had USG, and 10 (25%) presented with kidney calcifications. There was no significant difference in the amount of calcium and vitamin D doses among patients with kidney calcifications and others. No correlation between serum and urinary levels of calcium and the presence of calcification was found. Urinary calcium excretion in 24h was significantly higher in patients with kidney calcification (3.3 mg/kg/d) than in those without calcification (1.8 mg/kg/d) (p < 0.05). The reduction of hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia suggest an effectiveness of the treatment, and the increase in serum creatinine demonstrates an impairment of renal function during follow-up. Kidney calcifications were prevalent in this cohort, and higher urinary calcium excretion, even if still within the normal range, was associated with development of calcification. These findings suggest that lower rates of urinary calcium excretion should be aimed for in the management of hypoparathyroidism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Other 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Unknown 12 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2016.
All research outputs
#5,611,455
of 18,511,551 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#30
of 179 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,638
of 402,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,511,551 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 179 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 402,731 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them