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The role of social position and depressive symptoms in adolescence for life-course trajectories of education and work: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
The role of social position and depressive symptoms in adolescence for life-course trajectories of education and work: a cohort study
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3820-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evelina Landstedt, Anna Brydsten, Anne Hammarström, Pekka Virtanen, Ylva B. Almquist

Abstract

While a vast amount of studies confirm the social reproduction of class and status from one generation to the next, less is known about the role of health in the child generation for these processes. Research has shown that particularly mental distress in adolescence is important for future life chances. This study aimed to examine the importance of parental socioeconomic position and depressive symptoms in youth for life-course trajectories of education and labour market attachment among men and women. Based on four waves of questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort (n = 1,001), consisting of individuals born in 1965, three steps of gender-separate analyses were undertaken. First, the individual trajectories of education and labour market attachment from age 18 to 42 were mapped through sequence analysis. Second, cluster analysis was used to identify typical trajectories. Third, two indicators of parental socioeconomic position - occupational class and employment status - and depressive symptoms at age 16 were used in multinomial regression analyses to predict adult life-course trajectories. Four typical trajectories were identified for men, of which three were characterised by stable employment and various lengths of education, and the fourth reflected a more unstable situation. Among women, five trajectories emerged, characterised by more instability compared to men. Low parental occupational class and unemployment were significantly associated with a higher risk of ending up in less advantaged trajectories for men while, for women, this was only the case for occupational class. Youth levels of depressive symptoms did not significantly differ across the trajectories. This study found support for the intergenerational reproduction of social position, particularly when measured in terms of parental occupational class. Youth depressive symptoms did not show clear differences across types of trajectories, subsequently impeding such symptoms to trigger any selection processes. While this could be a consequence of the specific framework of the current study, it may also suggest that depressive symptoms in youth are not a root cause for the more complex processes through which how social position develops across life. The possible impact of welfare and labour market policies is discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 11 16%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 14 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Psychology 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 6%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 17 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2016.
All research outputs
#3,785,232
of 8,729,235 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,077
of 7,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,993
of 298,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#101
of 204 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,729,235 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,168 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 204 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.