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Origin of modern syphilis and emergence of a pandemic Treponema pallidum cluster

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Microbiology, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#24 of 853)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
33 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
89 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Origin of modern syphilis and emergence of a pandemic Treponema pallidum cluster
Published in
Nature Microbiology, December 2016
DOI 10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.245
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natasha Arora, Verena J. Schuenemann, Günter Jäger, Alexander Peltzer, Alexander Seitz, Alexander Herbig, Michal Strouhal, Linda Grillová, Leonor Sánchez-Busó, Denise Kühnert, Kirsten I. Bos, Leyla Rivero Davis, Lenka Mikalová, Sylvia Bruisten, Peter Komericki, Patrick French, Paul R. Grant, María A. Pando, Lucía Gallo Vaulet, Marcelo Rodríguez Fermepin, Antonio Martinez, Arturo Centurion Lara, Lorenzo Giacani, Steven J. Norris, David Šmajs, Philipp P. Bosshard, Fernando González-Candelas, Kay Nieselt, Johannes Krause, Homayoun C. Bagheri

Abstract

The abrupt onslaught of the syphilis pandemic that started in the late fifteenth century established this devastating infectious disease as one of the most feared in human history(1). Surprisingly, despite the availability of effective antibiotic treatment since the mid-twentieth century, this bacterial infection, which is caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA), has been re-emerging globally in the last few decades with an estimated 10.6 million cases in 2008 (ref. 2). Although resistance to penicillin has not yet been identified, an increasing number of strains fail to respond to the second-line antibiotic azithromycin(3). Little is known about the genetic patterns in current infections or the evolutionary origins of the disease due to the low quantities of treponemal DNA in clinical samples and difficulties in cultivating the pathogen(4). Here, we used DNA capture and whole-genome sequencing to successfully interrogate genome-wide variation from syphilis patient specimens, combined with laboratory samples of TPA and two other subspecies. Phylogenetic comparisons based on the sequenced genomes indicate that the TPA strains examined share a common ancestor after the fifteenth century, within the early modern era. Moreover, most contemporary strains are azithromycin-resistant and are members of a globally dominant cluster, named here as SS14-Ω. The cluster diversified from a common ancestor in the mid-twentieth century subsequent to the discovery of antibiotics. Its recent phylogenetic divergence and global presence point to the emergence of a pandemic strain cluster.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 89 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Germany 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 56 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 18%
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Unspecified 7 12%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 25%
Unspecified 12 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 15%
Computer Science 4 7%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 318. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2018.
All research outputs
#33,250
of 12,801,862 outputs
Outputs from Nature Microbiology
#24
of 853 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,124
of 371,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Microbiology
#3
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,801,862 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 853 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 69.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.