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Smad-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory bone destruction

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Smad-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory bone destruction
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13075-016-1187-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle Fennen, Thomas Pap, Berno Dankbar

Abstract

Homeostatic bone remodelling becomes disturbed in a variety of pathologic conditions that affect the skeleton, including inflammatory diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis is the prototype of an inflammatory arthritis characterised by chronic inflammation, progressive cartilage destruction and focal bone erosions and is a prime example for a disease with disturbed bone homeostasis. The inflammatory milieu favours the recruitment and activation of osteoclasts, which have been found to be the cells that are primarily responsible for bone erosions in many animal models of inflammatory arthritis. Among the inflammatory modulators, members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β super family are shown to be important regulators in osteoclastogenesis with Smad-mediated signalling being crucial for inducing osteoclast differentiation. These findings have opened a new field for exploring mechanisms of osteoclast differentiation under inflammatory conditions. Recent studies have shown that the TGF-β superfamily members TGF-β1, myostatin and activin A directly regulate osteoclast differentiation through mechanisms that depend on the RANKL-RANK interplay. These growth factors transduce their signals through type I and II receptor serine/threonine kinases, thereby activating the Smad pathway. In this review, we describe the impact of inflammation-induced Smad signalling in osteoclast development and subsequently bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bulgaria 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Researcher 2 8%
Other 6 25%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 38%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,249,895
of 11,622,318 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#961
of 1,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,160
of 324,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#9
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,622,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.