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Cost and cost-effectiveness of tuberculosis treatment shortening: a model-based analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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164 Mendeley
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Title
Cost and cost-effectiveness of tuberculosis treatment shortening: a model-based analysis
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2064-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

G. B. Gomez, D. W. Dowdy, M. L. Bastos, A. Zwerling, S. Sweeney, N. Foster, A. Trajman, M. A. Islam, S. Kapiga, E. Sinanovic, G. M. Knight, R. G. White, W. A. Wells, F. G. Cobelens, A. Vassall

Abstract

Despite improvements in treatment success rates for tuberculosis (TB), current six-month regimen duration remains a challenge for many National TB Programmes, health systems, and patients. There is increasing investment in the development of shortened regimens with a number of candidates in phase 3 trials. We developed an individual-based decision analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of a hypothetical four-month regimen for first-line treatment of TB, assuming non-inferiority to current regimens of six-month duration. The model was populated using extensive, empirically-collected data to estimate the economic impact on both health systems and patients of regimen shortening for first-line TB treatment in South Africa, Brazil, Bangladesh, and Tanzania. We explicitly considered 'real world' constraints such as sub-optimal guideline adherence. From a societal perspective, a shortened regimen, priced at USD1 per day, could be a cost-saving option in South Africa, Brazil, and Tanzania, but would not be cost-effective in Bangladesh when compared to one gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. Incorporating 'real world' constraints reduces cost-effectiveness. Patient-incurred costs could be reduced in all settings. From a health service perspective, increased drug costs need to be balanced against decreased delivery costs. The new regimen would remain a cost-effective option, when compared to each countries' GDP per capita, even if new drugs cost up to USD7.5 and USD53.8 per day in South Africa and Brazil; this threshold was above USD1 in Tanzania and under USD1 in Bangladesh. Reducing the duration of first-line TB treatment has the potential for substantial economic gains from a patient perspective. The potential economic gains for health services may also be important, but will be context-specific and dependent on the appropriate pricing of any new regimen.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 164 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 20%
Student > Master 27 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 10%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Student > Postgraduate 10 6%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 43 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 10 6%
Social Sciences 9 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 4%
Other 36 22%
Unknown 55 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2021.
All research outputs
#3,758,191
of 21,636,364 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,176
of 7,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,626
of 423,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#105
of 591 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,636,364 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,371 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 423,536 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 591 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.