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Arsenic contamination of drinking water in Ireland: A spatial analysis of occurrence and potential risk

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
Title
Arsenic contamination of drinking water in Ireland: A spatial analysis of occurrence and potential risk
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, February 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.171
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellen R. McGrory, Colin Brown, Norma Bargary, Natalya Hunter Williams, Anthony Mannix, Chaosheng Zhang, Tiernan Henry, Eve Daly, Sarah Nicholas, Barbara M. Petrunic, Monica Lee, Liam Morrison

Abstract

The presence of arsenic in groundwater has become a global concern due to the health risks from drinking water with elevated concentrations. The Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Union calls for drinking water risk assessment for member states. The present study amalgamates readily available national and sub-national scale datasets on arsenic in groundwater in the Republic of Ireland. However, due to the presence of high levels of left censoring (i.e. arsenic values below an analytical detection limit) and changes in detection limits over time, the application of conventional statistical methods would inhibit the generation of meaningful results. In order to handle these issues several arsenic databases were integrated and the data modelled using statistical methods appropriate for non-detect data. In addition, geostatistical methods were used to assess principal risk components of elevated arsenic related to lithology, aquifer type and groundwater vulnerability. Geographic statistical methods were used to overcome some of the geographical limitations of the Irish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sample database. Nearest-neighbour inverse distance weighting (IDW) and local indicator of spatial association (LISA) methods were used to estimate risk in non-sampled areas. Significant differences were also noted between different aquifer lithologies, indicating that Rhyolite, Sandstone and Shale (Greywackes), and Impure Limestone potentially presented a greater risk of elevated arsenic in groundwaters. Significant differences also occurred among aquifer types with poorly productive aquifers, locally important fractured bedrock aquifers and regionally important fissured bedrock aquifers presenting the highest potential risk of elevated arsenic. No significant differences were detected among different groundwater vulnerability groups as defined by the Geological Survey of Ireland. This research will assist management and future policy directions of groundwater resources at EU level and guide future research focused on understanding arsenic mobilisation processes to facilitate in guiding future development, testing and treatment requirements of groundwater resources.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 1 1%
Unknown 67 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 22%
Student > Master 11 16%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 15 22%
Unknown 7 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 24%
Engineering 10 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 13%
Chemistry 9 13%
Unspecified 3 4%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2017.
All research outputs
#628,571
of 12,269,384 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#365
of 8,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,623
of 338,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#33
of 439 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,384 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,317 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 439 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.