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A roadmap of cell-type specific gene expression during sequential stages of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2013
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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75 Dimensions

Readers on

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124 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
A roadmap of cell-type specific gene expression during sequential stages of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-14-306
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudia Hogekamp, Helge Küster

Abstract

BACKGROUND: About 80% of today's land plants are able to establish an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis with Glomeromycota fungi to improve their access to nutrients and water in the soil. On the molecular level, the development of AM symbioses is only partly understood, due to the asynchronous development of the microsymbionts in the host roots. Although many genes specifically activated during fungal colonization have been identified, genome-wide information on the exact place and time point of their activation remains limited. RESULTS: In this study, we relied on a combination of laser-microdissection and the use of Medicago GeneChips to perform a genome-wide analysis of transcription patterns in defined cell-types of Medicago truncatula roots mycorrhized with Glomus intraradices. To cover major stages of AM development, we harvested cells at 5-6 and at 21 days post inoculation (dpi). Early developmental stages of the AM symbiosis were analysed by monitoring gene expression in appressorial and non-appressorial areas from roots harbouring infection units at 5-6 dpi. Here, the use of laser-microdissection for the first time enabled the targeted harvest of those sites, where fungal hyphae first penetrate the root. Circumventing contamination with developing arbuscules, we were able to specifically detect gene expression related to early infection events. To cover the late stages of AM formation, we studied arbusculated cells, cortical cells colonized by intraradical hyphae, and epidermal cells from mature mycorrhizal roots at 21 dpi. Taken together, the cell-specific expression patterns of 18014 genes were revealed, including 1392 genes whose transcription was influenced by mycorrhizal colonization at different stages, namely the pre-contact phase, the infection of roots via fungal appressoria, the subsequent colonization of the cortex by fungal hyphae, and finally the formation of arbuscules. Our cellular expression patterns identified distinct groups of AM-activated genes governing the sequential reprogramming of host roots towards an accommodation of microsymbionts, including 42 AM-activated transcription factor genes. CONCLUSIONS: Our genome-wide analysis provides novel information on the cell-specific activity of AM-activated genes during both early and late stages of AM development, together revealing the road map of fine-tuned adjustments of transcript accumulation within root tissues during AM fungal colonization.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
France 2 2%
Netherlands 2 2%
Italy 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 115 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 29%
Researcher 24 19%
Student > Master 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 8 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 90 73%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 11%
Environmental Science 5 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 <1%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 11 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2014.
All research outputs
#1,928,154
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,784
of 4,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,956
of 88,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#73
of 158 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,113 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 88,925 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 158 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.