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The influence of masticatory loading on craniofacial morphology: A test case across technological transitions in the Ohio valley

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Physical Anthropology, November 2009
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Title
The influence of masticatory loading on craniofacial morphology: A test case across technological transitions in the Ohio valley
Published in
American Journal of Physical Anthropology, November 2009
DOI 10.1002/ajpa.21151
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolina Paschetta, Soledad de Azevedo, Lucía Castillo, Neus Martínez-Abadías, Miquel Hernández, Daniel E. Lieberman, Rolando González-José

Abstract

Masticatory loading is one of the main environmental stimuli that generate craniofacial variation among recent humans. Experimental studies on a wide variety of mammals, including those with retrognathic postcanine teeth, predict that responses to masticatory loading will be greater in the occlusal plane, the inferior rostrum, and regions associated with the attachments of the temporalis and masseter muscles. Here we test these experimentally-derived predictions on an extinct human population from the middle and upper Ohio valley that underwent a marked shift from hunting-gathering to extensive farming during the last 3,000 years and for which we have good archaeological evidence about diet and food processing technology. Geometric morphometric methods were used to detect and measure the putative effect of diet changes on cranial shape independent of size. Our results partially confirm only some of the experimental predictions. The effect of softer and/or less tough diets on craniofacial shape seem to be concentrated in the relative reduction of the temporal fossa and in a displacement of the attachment of the temporal muscle. However, there were few differences in craniofacial shape in regions closer to the occlusal plane. These results highlight the utility of exploring specific localized morphological shifts using a hierarchical model of craniofacial integration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Argentina 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 119 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 17%
Researcher 23 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Student > Postgraduate 12 9%
Student > Master 11 8%
Other 35 26%
Unknown 10 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 42%
Social Sciences 22 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 6%
Arts and Humanities 5 4%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 13 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2018.
All research outputs
#11,401,489
of 14,378,609 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Physical Anthropology
#2,331
of 2,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,385
of 151,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Physical Anthropology
#24
of 27 outputs
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