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Mapping With a Few Plants: Using Selective Mapping for Microsatellite Saturation of the Prunus Reference Map

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics, August 2005
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Title
Mapping With a Few Plants: Using Selective Mapping for Microsatellite Saturation of the Prunus Reference Map
Published in
Genetics, August 2005
DOI 10.1534/genetics.105.043661
Pubmed ID
Authors

Werner Howad, Toshiya Yamamoto, Elisabeth Dirlewanger, Raffaele Testolin, Patrick Cosson, Guido Cipriani, Antonio J. Monforte, Laura Georgi, Albert G. Abbott, Pere Arús

Abstract

The concept of selective (or bin) mapping is used here for the first time, using as an example the Prunus reference map constructed with an almond x peach F2 population. On the basis of this map, a set of six plants that jointly defined 65 possible different genotypes for the codominant markers mapped on it was selected. Sixty-three of these joint genotypes corresponded to a single chromosomal region (a bin) of the Prunus genome, and the two remaining corresponded to two bins each. The 67 bins defined by these six plants had a 7.8-cM average length and a maximum individual length of 24.7 cM. Using a unit of analysis composed of these six plants, their F1 hybrid parent, and one of the parents of the hybrid, we mapped 264 microsatellite (or simple-sequence repeat, SSR) markers from 401 different microsatellite primer pairs. Bin mapping proved to be a fast and economic strategy that could be used for further map saturation, the addition of valuable markers (such as those based on microsatellites or ESTs), and giving a wider scope to, and a more efficient use of, reference mapping populations.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 4 3%
Italy 2 2%
Serbia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Gambia 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 113 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 29%
Student > Master 13 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 23 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 111 86%
Unspecified 8 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Environmental Science 2 2%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 3 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2005.
All research outputs
#7,895,999
of 12,584,264 outputs
Outputs from Genetics
#3,332
of 4,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,634,390
of 12,044,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics
#3,209
of 4,308 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,584,264 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,473 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 4,308 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.