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Alternative life histories shape brain gene expression profiles in males of the same population

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2005
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Title
Alternative life histories shape brain gene expression profiles in males of the same population
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2005
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2005.3125
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadia Aubin-Horth, Christian R Landry, Benjamin H Letcher, Hans A Hofmann

Abstract

Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) undergo spectacular marine migrations before homing to spawn in natal rivers. However, males that grow fastest early in life can adopt an alternative 'sneaker' tactic by maturing earlier at greatly reduced size without leaving freshwater. While the ultimate evolutionary causes have been well studied, virtually nothing is known about the molecular bases of this developmental plasticity. We investigate the nature and extent of coordinated molecular changes that accompany such a fundamental transformation by comparing the brain transcription profiles of wild mature sneaker males to age-matched immature males (future large anadromous males) and immature females. Of the ca. 3000 genes surveyed, 15% are differentially expressed in the brains of the two male types. These genes are involved in a wide range of processes, including growth, reproduction and neural plasticity. Interestingly, despite the potential for wide variation in gene expression profiles among individuals sampled in nature, consistent patterns of gene expression were found for individuals of the same reproductive tactic. Notably, gene expression patterns in immature males were different both from immature females and sneakers, indicating that delayed maturation and sea migration by immature males, the 'default' life cycle, may actually result from an active inhibition of development into a sneaker.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 167 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 5%
United Kingdom 4 2%
Portugal 4 2%
France 3 2%
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 143 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 46 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 25%
Professor > Associate Professor 19 11%
Student > Master 12 7%
Other 10 6%
Other 38 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 116 69%
Environmental Science 16 10%
Unspecified 13 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 6%
Neuroscience 4 2%
Other 8 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2005.
All research outputs
#2,248,004
of 4,012,938 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3,221
of 3,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,673,626
of 3,035,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,288
of 2,877 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,012,938 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,943 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 2,877 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.