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Changes in cardiac repolarisation during spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes: a preliminary report

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Diabetologica, December 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Changes in cardiac repolarisation during spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes: a preliminary report
Published in
Acta Diabetologica, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00592-016-0941-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Minna L. Koivikko, Tuomas Kenttä, Pasi I. Salmela, Heikki V. Huikuri, Juha S. Perkiömäki

Abstract

Experimental studies have revealed that hypoglycaemia can result in morphological changes in electrocardiographic repolarisation in subjects with type 1 diabetes. However, the influence of spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycaemia on repolarisation morphology in a 'real life' situation is not clear. Adults with type 1 diabetes (n = 11) underwent continuous glucose monitoring with a subcutaneous sensor and digital 12-lead ECG recording for three nights. T-wave morphology was analysed with custom-made software during both hypoglycaemia (glucose <3.5 mmol/l at least 20 min) from ten consecutive heart beats in the middle of the deepest hypoglycaemia and from a control nonhypoglycaemic period (glucose ≥5.0 mmol/l) from the same recording. In the comparison of 10 hypoglycaemia-control pairs, heart rate (65 ± 12 beats/min during normoglycaemia versus 85 ± 19 beats/min during hypoglycaemia, p = 0.028) increased and the QTc interval (439 ± 5 vs. 373 ± 5 ms, respectively, p = 0.025) decreased significantly during hypoglycaemia. The spatial QRS-T angle (TCRT) was reduced, and the roughness of the T-wave loop (T-E) increased significantly (p = 0.037 for both) in the patients during hypoglycaemia. In adults with type 1 diabetes, spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycaemia results in morphological changes and increased heterogeneity of global cardiac repolarisation. These changes may contribute to the risk of 'dead in bed' syndrome encountered in young individuals with type 1 diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 25%
Researcher 4 14%
Other 3 11%
Lecturer 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Engineering 2 7%
Computer Science 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,326,237
of 12,221,976 outputs
Outputs from Acta Diabetologica
#182
of 489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,211
of 335,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Diabetologica
#8
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,221,976 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 489 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,433 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.