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Growth Differentiation Factor 11 Is a Circulating Factor that Reverses Age-Related Cardiac Hypertrophy

Overview of attention for article published in Cell, May 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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671 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
985 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Growth Differentiation Factor 11 Is a Circulating Factor that Reverses Age-Related Cardiac Hypertrophy
Published in
Cell, May 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2013.04.015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco S. Loffredo, Matthew L. Steinhauser, Steven M. Jay, Joseph Gannon, James R. Pancoast, Pratyusha Yalamanchi, Manisha Sinha, Claudia Dall’Osso, Danika Khong, Jennifer L. Shadrach, Christine M. Miller, Britta S. Singer, Alex Stewart, Nikolaos Psychogios, Robert E. Gerszten, Adam J. Hartigan, Mi-Jeong Kim, Thomas Serwold, Amy J. Wagers, Richard T. Lee

Abstract

The most common form of heart failure occurs with normal systolic function and often involves cardiac hypertrophy in the elderly. To clarify the biological mechanisms that drive cardiac hypertrophy in aging, we tested the influence of circulating factors using heterochronic parabiosis, a surgical technique in which joining of animals of different ages leads to a shared circulation. After 4 weeks of exposure to the circulation of young mice, cardiac hypertrophy in old mice dramatically regressed, accompanied by reduced cardiomyocyte size and molecular remodeling. Reversal of age-related hypertrophy was not attributable to hemodynamic or behavioral effects of parabiosis, implicating a blood-borne factor. Using modified aptamer-based proteomics, we identified the TGF-β superfamily member GDF11 as a circulating factor in young mice that declines with age. Treatment of old mice to restore GDF11 to youthful levels recapitulated the effects of parabiosis and reversed age-related hypertrophy, revealing a therapeutic opportunity for cardiac aging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 112 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 985 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 33 3%
United Kingdom 8 <1%
Japan 5 <1%
Portugal 4 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Korea, Republic of 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Other 17 2%
Unknown 906 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 233 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 226 23%
Student > Bachelor 97 10%
Student > Master 91 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 50 5%
Other 193 20%
Unknown 95 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 335 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 202 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 161 16%
Engineering 37 4%
Neuroscience 29 3%
Other 93 9%
Unknown 128 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1006. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2022.
All research outputs
#11,382
of 21,409,348 outputs
Outputs from Cell
#94
of 16,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51
of 173,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell
#3
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,409,348 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,319 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,715 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.