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Rural and Urban Breastfeeding Initiation Trends in Low-Income Women in North Carolina from 2003 to 2007

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Human Lactation, January 2012
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Title
Rural and Urban Breastfeeding Initiation Trends in Low-Income Women in North Carolina from 2003 to 2007
Published in
Journal of Human Lactation, January 2012
DOI 10.1177/0890334411430086
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suzanne Lynch, Jeffrey Bethel, Najmul Chowdhury, Justin B. Moore

Abstract

Breastfeeding has extensive health benefits for both infants and mothers. Despite these benefits, a significant number of women, disproportionately low-income women, do not initiate breastfeeding. Previous research has also demonstrated that breastfeeding prevalence varies by urbanicity level. The objective was to examine race/ethnicity and urbanicity trends in breastfeeding initiation among low-income women in North Carolina from 2003 to 2007. Breastfeeding initiation data from the North Carolina Pregnancy Nutrition Surveillance System were utilized, with responses from 240,054 women over the 5-year period. Overall, 65.4% of women in mixed-urban counties and 62.1% of women in urban counties initiated breastfeeding compared to only 49.8% of women in rural counties. The disparity between rural and urban counties widened over time, with urban and mixed-urban counties making significantly greater gains in breastfeeding initiation than rural counties. Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women had 6.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.99-6.36) and 1.4 (95% CI, 1.46-1.53) times the odds of initiating breastfeeding as non-Hispanic blacks, respectively. Finally, stratified multivariate regression models identified that the association between race/ethnicity and breastfeeding varied by urbanicity level. The current study provides a clearer picture of rural and urban breastfeeding trends within North Carolina and has implications for states with similar racial/ethnic and urbanicity levels. The research determined that women in rural areas, particularly non-Hispanic blacks, are less likely to initiate breastfeeding. Increased emphasis should be placed on developing breastfeeding interventions for rural communities, particularly targeting the non-Hispanic black population.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 14%
Other 3 11%
Other 7 25%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 29%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Unspecified 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2012.
All research outputs
#2,900,481
of 3,629,660 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Human Lactation
#322
of 404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,176
of 84,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Human Lactation
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,629,660 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 84,809 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.