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Physical inactivity among physiotherapy undergraduates: exploring the knowledge-practice gap

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, December 2016
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Title
Physical inactivity among physiotherapy undergraduates: exploring the knowledge-practice gap
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13102-016-0063-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chathuranga Ranasinghe, Chathurani Sigera, Priyanga Ranasinghe, Ranil Jayawardena, Ayodya C. R. Ranasinghe, Andrew P. Hills, Neil King

Abstract

Physical inactivity is a common risk factor for several non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Increasing physical activity could reduce the burden of disease due to major NCDs and increase life expectancy. Undergraduate physiotherapy students represent a group of young-adults expected to have a good knowledge of physical activity. We evaluated physical activity levels of undergraduate physiotherapy students of University of Colombo, Sri Lanka and determined their motives and barriers for participation in physical activity. All physiotherapy undergraduates studying at the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka in 2013 were invited for the study. Phase one was a quantitative study to evaluate the physical activity levels and phase two was a qualitative study to identify motives and barriers for physical activity and sports in the same cohort. Physical activity levels (phase 1) were assessed using the interviewer administered International Physical Activity Questionnaire (long-version). The qualitative study (phase 2) was conducted in the same population using Focus Group Discussions (n = 3) and individual In-depth Interviews (n = 5). Sample size in phase 1 and phase 2 were 113 (response rate = 98%; [N-115]) and 87 (response rat = 97%; [N-90]) respectively. Mean age (±SD) of participants was 23.4 ± 1 years. The mean weekly total MET minutes (±SD) of the study population was 1791.25 ± 3097. According to the IPAQ categorical score a higher percentage of participants were 'inactive' (48.7%), while only 15.9% were in the 'Highly active' group. Lack of support and encouragement received during childhood to engage in sports activity seem to have played an important role in continuing their exercise behavior through to the adult life. Academic activities were given priority by both parents and teachers. The environment and support from teachers, family and friends were important to initiate and adhere to sports and physical activity. A higher percentage of participants were 'inactive', in spite of belonging to a group which is presumed to be knowledgeable regarding the benefits of physical activity. A significant negative attitude towards physical activity was observed in this cohort of young-adults. This seems to stem from earlier in life, due to lack of support and motivation for physical exercise and sports, received during primary and secondary schooling. This negative attitude has become a significant 'internal' barrier, which has not been changed in spite of their education.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 27%
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Researcher 8 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 21%
Sports and Recreations 13 14%
Social Sciences 8 9%
Psychology 5 5%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 15 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,665,056
of 8,750,501 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#124
of 151 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#208,170
of 299,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,750,501 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 151 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,544 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.