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Locating Risk in the Adolescent Brain: Ethical Challenges in the Use of Biomarkers for Adolescent Health and Social Policy

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, December 2016
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Title
Locating Risk in the Adolescent Brain: Ethical Challenges in the Use of Biomarkers for Adolescent Health and Social Policy
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, December 2016
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2016.18.12.stas1-1612
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Technological developments in neuroscience over the last 20 years have generated excitement about the potential of neuroscientific insights for the understanding of and intervention in children's and adolescents' behavior. This article introduces some ways in which new results from developmental cognitive neuroscience have been appropriated in the context of adolescent mental health. We also consider social and interpersonal factors that drive the use of neurobiological markers of mental disorders in pediatric psychiatry. Finally, we outline the current ambitions for using neurobiological biomarkers in adolescent mental health care and discuss some ethical challenges arising from the methodological, political, cultural, and social contexts of their application.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 27%
Student > Master 2 18%
Professor 1 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 9%
Researcher 1 9%
Other 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Psychology 2 18%
Unspecified 2 18%
Neuroscience 2 18%
Social Sciences 1 9%
Other 1 9%