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A series of patients with purging type anorexia nervosa who do “tube vomiting”

Overview of attention for article published in BioPsychoSocial Medicine, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
A series of patients with purging type anorexia nervosa who do “tube vomiting”
Published in
BioPsychoSocial Medicine, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13030-016-0083-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takeshi Horie, Saki Harashima, Ryo Yoneda, Maiko Hiraide, Shuji Inada, Makoto Otani, Kazuhiro Yoshiuchi

Abstract

It is important for clinicians to assess their patients' purging behavior. Various methods of purging, such as self-induced vomiting are well-known. Because patients do not always report their purging behavior, knowing the clinical signs that indicate the behavior is useful. However, we have experienced patients who did not have the reported physical signs of self-induced vomiting because they used hoses instead of their fingers to purge their stomach contents, which they call "tube vomiting". No other previous studies have reported the use of hoses as a purging tool. We present as our main case a 20-year-old Japanese woman with anorexia nervosa who engaged in "tube vomiting." Although she recovered well under medical treatment in our hospital, she began to lose weight and blood potassium soon after discharge. We found that she used a garden hose instead of her fingers to perform self-induced vomiting,. She inserted the hose into her stomach and evacuated the stomach contents through it, without pain. She learned this technique through a blog about eating disorders. We also present two other similar cases. In fact, many patients discuss "tube vomiting" on the internet. Our experience suggests that a sudden decrease in the weight and blood potassium level could indicate "tube vomiting". In addition, because many information resources are available on the internet, medical practitioners should be aware of these sites.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 22%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Mathematics 1 6%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,627,001
of 15,038,893 outputs
Outputs from BioPsychoSocial Medicine
#136
of 256 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,546
of 383,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BioPsychoSocial Medicine
#13
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,038,893 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 256 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 383,699 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.