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RANK CLOCKS AND PLANT COMMUNITY DYNAMICS

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, December 2008
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Citations

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Title
RANK CLOCKS AND PLANT COMMUNITY DYNAMICS
Published in
Ecology, December 2008
DOI 10.1890/07-1646.1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott L. Collins, Katharine N. Suding, Elsa E. Cleland, Michael Batty, Steven C. Pennings, Katherine L. Gross, James B. Grace, Laura Gough, Joe E. Fargione, Christopher M. Clark

Abstract

Summarizing complex temporal dynamics in communities is difficult to achieve in a way that yields an intuitive picture of change. Rank clocks and rank abundance statistics provide a graphical and analytical framework for displaying and quantifying community dynamics. We used rank clocks, in which the rank order abundance for each species is plotted over time in temporal clockwise direction, to display temporal changes in species abundances and richness. We used mean rank shift and proportional species persistence to quantify changes in community structure in long-term data sets from fertilized and control plots in a late successional old field, frequently and infrequently burned tallgrass prairie, and Chihuahuan desert grassland and shrubland communities. Rank clocks showed that relatively constant species richness masks considerable temporal dynamics in relative species abundances. In the old field, fertilized plots initially experienced high mean rank shifts that stabilized rapidly below that of unfertilized plots. Rank shifts were higher in infrequently burned vs. annually burned tallgrass prairie and in desert grassland compared to shrubland vegetation. Proportional persistence showed that arid grasslands were more dynamic than mesic grasslands. We conclude that rank clocks and rank abundance statistics provide important insights into community dynamics that are often hidden by traditional univariate approaches.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 211 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 6%
Canada 3 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
China 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Panama 1 <1%
Unknown 186 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 27%
Researcher 55 26%
Student > Master 18 9%
Student > Bachelor 15 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 15 7%
Other 37 18%
Unknown 15 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 101 48%
Environmental Science 71 34%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 <1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 5 2%
Unknown 21 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2019.
All research outputs
#8,582,682
of 14,257,572 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#4,120
of 5,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,394
of 152,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#69
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,257,572 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,375 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 152,281 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.