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Grizzly bear predation links the loss of native trout to the demography of migratory elk in Yellowstone

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
38 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Grizzly bear predation links the loss of native trout to the demography of migratory elk in Yellowstone
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, July 2013
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.0870
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arthur D. Middleton, Thomas A. Morrison, Jennifer K. Fortin, Charles T. Robbins, Kelly M. Proffitt, P. J. White, Douglas E. McWhirter, Todd M. Koel, Douglas G. Brimeyer, W. Sue Fairbanks, Matthew J. Kauffman

Abstract

The loss of aquatic subsidies such as spawning salmonids is known to threaten a number of terrestrial predators, but the effects on alternative prey species are poorly understood. At the heart of the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, an invasion of lake trout has driven a dramatic decline of native cutthroat trout that migrate up the shallow tributaries of Yellowstone Lake to spawn each spring. We explore whether this decline has amplified the effect of a generalist consumer, the grizzly bear, on populations of migratory elk that summer inside Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Recent studies of bear diets and elk populations indicate that the decline in cutthroat trout has contributed to increased predation by grizzly bears on the calves of migratory elk. Additionally, a demographic model that incorporates the increase in predation suggests that the magnitude of this diet shift has been sufficient to reduce elk calf recruitment (4-16%) and population growth (2-11%). The disruption of this aquatic-terrestrial linkage could permanently alter native species interactions in YNP. Although many recent ecological changes in YNP have been attributed to the recovery of large carnivores--particularly wolves--our work highlights a growing role of human impacts on the foraging behaviour of grizzly bears.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 6%
Canada 3 2%
South Africa 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 144 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 26%
Researcher 28 17%
Student > Master 26 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 10%
Other 13 8%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 12 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 86 53%
Environmental Science 48 30%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 17 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 88. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2015.
All research outputs
#251,271
of 16,008,245 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#725
of 8,282 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,210
of 157,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#14
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,008,245 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,282 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.